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CURRENT PRESS RELEASES

April 2014

CAPIC Congratulates Daniel Morel in His Case Against Media Giants Getty Images and AFP.

December 02, 2013

December 2, 2013 - Since its founding in 1978 CAPIC has worked hard to maintain industry standards, create a community, fight for copyright protection for professional photographers and illustrators. The first bill was presented 12 years ago and after three subsequent attempts at amending the Copyright Act, Canada's Copyright Modernization Act ("Bill C-11") was finally proclaimed into force on November 7, 2012.

Now, just shortly over 1 year since Bill C-11 was passed, Canada has seen some improvements under the new copyright laws, others are still effected by imbalances in relationship between copyright owners and copyright users, as in the case of Daniel Morel, a well-known photojournalist, against media giants AFP and Getty Images.

CAPIC, as a collective voice and advocate for professional photographers everywhere would like to congratulate Mr. Morel on the success of his case against Getty Images and AFP, the jury found that AFP and Getty Images willfully infringed Morel’s copyright, with damages awarded that are the largest allowable: $150,000 per image (1.2 Million). Let this case be a lesson to everyone on the importance of knowing how to safely share images online and have knowledge of your copyrights. These values are vital not only to photographers, but also our culture.

...they did it because they could. They did it because they’re AFP and Getty. They thought: ‘We can put these pictures out and buy this guy off.’ They did it because that’s the way they are.
- Joseph Baio, attorney for photojournalist Daniel Morel

Morel took dramatic, award-winning photographs in Haiti during the first moments following the January 12, 2010 earthquake that devastated his native country. An AFP editor took many of the photographs off the internet and distributed them through AFP’s “feed” and through Getty Images’ electronic distribution network and website. The photographs were ascribed to “Lisandro Suero,” who was in the Dominican Republic at the time of the earthquake, and credited to “AFP/Getty Images.” As a result, Mr. Morel’s misattributed images were licensed to AFP and Getty Images customers around the world. On November 22nd , 2013, Judge Nathan found that AFP and Getty Images violated the US Copyright Act and infringed Mr. Morel’s copyright when they took Mr. Morel’s photographs off the internet, misidentified them, added their own names to the credit lines, and licensed them to their world-wide client.

For more information about the trial, please click here: https://www.facebook.com/events/649954168369985/

For more information about CAPIC, please visit http://www.capic.org

For further information, please contact:

Rosemary Chapman
CAPIC
416-462-3677 x 233
1-800-252-2742
info@capic.org
www.capic.org

CAPIC opposes the new TC Media contract, which strips freelancers of their rights.

March 01, 2013

CAPIC opposes the new TC Media contract, which stripsfreelancers of their rights.

For Immediate Release.

Montréal, February 26, 2013 - TC Media (also known as Transcontinental Inc.), publisher of magazines such as Coup de pouce, Les affaires and Elle Canada, as well as dozens of regional newspapers across Canada, is trying to impose an abusive new contract on its freelancers. The conditions of this contract weaken the rights of everyone in the editorial field and impair the viability and integrity of their trade.

TC Media requires that its freelancers waive the copyrights and moral rights associated with their photographs, videos, texts and illustrations. It thus arrogates the right to republish the freelancers' works on all platforms and under all corporate trade-marks, worldwide, in perpetuity, without any compensation or subsequent authorization by the author. TC Media also requires the right to alter the freelancers' work as it sees fit, and the right to remove the freelancer's signature or retain the signature after making changes unilaterally.

In short, TC Media is claiming the same rights to its freelancers' work as those it holds to its employees' work, while keeping the freelance rates down. CAPIC is opposed to any unlimited assignment of rights in a freelance context.

CAPIC invites its members and the entire community of freelancers to refuse to sign this abusive and dangerous contract because it will be a very harmful precedent for all freelance content creators in Canada and Quebec. CAPIC therefore recommends amending the terms of this contract to limit its scope.

CAPIC, in association with the Regroupement des Artistes en Arts Visuels (RAAV), has taken steps to meet the senior executives of TC Media to persuade them to amend this contract so that it is fairer for freelancers. This concerted action is supported by Illustration Québec (IQ), the Association des Journalistes Indépendants du Québec (AJIQ) and the Canadian Media Guild (CMG). We invite all other concerned associations to join this coalition.

We invite you to share this news release with your colleagues working in the editorial field - particularly with those who are freelancing at TC Media.

Contact CAPIC at this dedicated address: (tc@capicmontreal.ca).

About CAPIC: CAPIC is a Canada-wide not-for-profit association dedicated to promoting the work of photographers and illustrators in communications, defending their interests and promoting high quality standards in the practice of their trade. It brings together more than 600 of the best photographers and illustrators in Canada.

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Source: capicmontreal.ca / capic.org

A GREAT VICTORY FOR CANADIAN PHOTOGRAPHERS

November 07, 2012

At last, Canadian photographers owns their copyright.

The Canadian Association of Professional Image Creators (CAPIC) would like to congratulate all Canadian photographers in Canada on this important date and pivotal achievement in the photographic industry. As of today, Canadian photographers now officially own the copyright to all of their work whether the photograph is commissioned or not, thanks to the new Copyright law.

The principle of protecting photographers’ ownership rights started 65 years ago by Henri Cartier-Bresson, who founded Magnum with Robert Capa and David Seymour. Magnum assured that a photographer’s image belonged to the photographer and not to the commissioner of the work.

In Canada, all other artists have already owned the copyrights to their work and thanks to this new law, Canadian photographers, albeit the last in the industrialized world, now have all legal rights to their images.

CAPIC has been working towards this monumental achievement in Canada for more than 20 years through lobbying efforts and could not have achieved this truly important mission without the support of its members, who have contributed financially, morally and offered countless volunteer hours towards this major effort led by CAPIC National Copyright Chair, Andre Cornellier.

The Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOC) were a valuable partner in this achievement as well as the lobbying firm Temple Scott Associates for their work in Ottawa.

‘‘I would like to thank the team that worked so patiently and for so long,’’ commented Cornellier. ‘‘Finally we have won a right due to us as artists. Thank you to Canadian photographers across the country for your support and patience and to André Amyot and Brian Boyle of PPOC for your work. It has been worth it.’’
CAPIC will be providing more information on the direct effects of the law for Canadian photographers in the week to come as we celebrate this important Canadian achievement.

For more information:
André Cornellier
Copyright Chair
CAPIC, The Canadian Association of Professional Image Creators
andre@cornellierphoto.com
tel.: 514.933.4000
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Canadian Photographers Welcome the Introduction of Copyright Reform

September 29, 2011

OTTAWA, September 29, 2011: The Canadian Photographers Coalition (CPC) welcomes the reintroduction of copyright reform legislation.

The Copyright Modernization Act includes a provision to award photographers first ownership on commissioned works; a right held by all other creators.

“The Copyright Act is an important policy tool for the promotion of Canada’s culture and Canadians’ creativity,” stated André Cornellier, Coalition Co-chair. “As professional photographers, we understand first-hand the importance of ensuring a modern Copyright Act promoting both of these objectives.”

“In 2008 and 2010, we welcomed copyright reform and its recognition of photographers as equals among their creative colleagues. Heritage Minister James Moore and Industry Minister Christian Paradis have again committed to ending this inequity,” said Brian Boyle, Coalition Cochair.

“We are extremely pleased with the government’s decision to recognize photographers as authors of commissioned works. Building on that principle, we will seek a small technical amendment to the bill at committee,” added Mr. Cornellier.

The Canadian Photographers Coalition was formed to support the extension of copyright fairness to Canada’s working professional photographers. The Coalition represents the interests of two professional associations: the Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOC) and the Canadian Association of Professional Image Creator (CAPIC).

Together the groups represent professional photographers working in all aspects of the craft and in all regions of the country. There are over 14,000 professional photographers working and living in Canadian communities from coast to coast. Over 95 per cent of professional photographers are small business people, owning, operating and working in their own businesses and dependent on sales of their work to support their families. Like all small business people, photographers are part of the engine that drives the Canadian economy.

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For further information: Emily Pearce, Temple Scott Associates, (613) 241-6000 ext. 246

CAPIC PUBLISHES XPOSE 2010 BOOKS & ANNOUNCES ITS NEW NAME

November 15, 2010

TORONTO, ON: November 15, 2010 – CAPIC is proud to announce that the prestigious CAPIC 2010 xpose book is being distributed today to over 2,000 members of Canada's advertising and design communities. The 2010 xpose book features the best images from the 2010 xpose contest, now in its third year, a juried exhibition of work from CAPIC members.

“The xpose contest is one of the most important projects that CAPIC has been undertaking in the past couple of years” says Michael Kohn, xpose Committee Chair. “The images submitted to this year’s contest were really strong, and I’m extremely pleased to present such a diverse and professional book representing the wealth of some of CAPIC’s members.”

New Name
CAPIC is also pleased to announce its new name The Canadian Association of Professional Image Creators. In response to the changes in the photography and illustration industry, and in the work of our members, CAPIC aims to represent the professional image creators who are working in not only in one media but utilize a number of creative forms in their work.

“We are thrilled about the new name as it sets the association on a new and exciting path” says Christian Fleury, President of CAPIC. “We are prepared to better represent our membership and at the same time welcome new image creators who all combine still photography, video and other creative forms. Stay tuned for further development and changes in the association!”

About CAPIC
CAPIC, founded in 1978, is a not-for-profit association dedicated to safeguarding and promoting the rights and interests of professional photographers, illustrators and digital artists working in the communications industry. CAPIC has six chapters, spanning the country from Halifax to Vancouver, with a membership of over 700. We work hard to maintain industry standards, create a community, fight for copyright protection, promote our members and much more. CAPIC is the acknowledged leader in business practices education for illustrators and photographers in Canada, and works for the education of industry standards for all illustration and photography students in Canadian post secondary programs.

For further information, please contact:

Aga Baranowska
CAPIC
416-462-3677 x 230
1-800-252-2742
info@capic.org
www.capic.org

Message from CAPIC's Copyright Chair

June 02, 2010

CAPIC's Copyright Chair, André Cornellier, is pleased to share exciting news with CAPIC's members.

OTTAWA, June 2, 2010:

Canadian photographers welcome the introduction of copyright reform.

The Canadian Photographers Coalition (CPC) congratulates the Federal Government on the introduction of copyright reform legislation. The Copyright Modernization Act includes a provision to award photographers first ownership on commissioned works; a right held by all other creators.

"Today is a great day for Canadian photographers," stated André Cornellier, Coalition Co-chair. "The Copyright Act is an important policy tool for the promotion of Canada's culture and Canadians' creativity. As professional photographers, we understand first-hand the importance of ensuring a modern Copyright Act promotes both of these objectives."

"These amendments allow Canadian small business photographers the opportunity to generate additional revenues for their commercial work. At the same time, they strike a balance by allowing consumers the use of commissioned personal photographs for private non-commercial purposes," Cornellier added.

"In 2008, we welcomed Bill C-61 and its recognition of photographers as equals among their creative colleagues. Including similar provisions in this Bill, Heritage Minister James Moore and Industry Minister Tony Clement have again committed to ending this inequity," said Brian Boyle, Coalition Co-chair.

The Canadian Photographers Coalition was formed to support the extension of copyright fairness to Canada's working professional photographers. The Coalition represents the interests of two professional associations: the Canadian Association of Photographers and Illustrators in Communications (CAPIC) and the Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOC).

Together the groups represent professional photographers working in all aspects of the craft and in all regions of the country. There are over 14,000 professional photographers working and living in Canadian communities from coast to coast. Over 95 per cent of professional photographers are small business people, owning, operating and working in their own businesses and dependent on sales of their work to support their families. Like all small business people, photographers are part of the engine that drives the Canadian economy.

Orphan Works Update

June 19, 2008

TORONTO - May 15, 2008 - The controversial United States Orphan Works legislation, originally proposed in 2006, is before the US Congress once again.

For a detailed analysis of the proposed legislation and the effect it has had on US trade organizations and creators' groups, as reported by Photo District News, click here: www.pdnonline.com/pdn/newswire/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003801084

CAPIC's position is that this legislation is not in the best interest of creators, within the United States and internationally. This position is outlined by CAPIC Copyright Chair Andre Cornellier in a letter sent to CAPIC members earlier today.

Dear CAPIC Members;

The United States Congress is on the verge of voting on a Bill called the "ORPHAN WORKS BILL". Lobbyists from the motion picture industry, the internet industry, associations of museums and others are promoting this Bill. This proposed legislation stipulates that any work where the author is not known could be used and commercialized at will if a reasonably diligent search has failed to find the author. The scope of this reasonably diligent search would be determined by the user/infringer.

This Bill targets all types of work: from professional paintings to family snapshots, artistic work, commercial work, personal and wedding photos, published or non-published, from literary works, to music, to visual arts, to film and works that reside or have ever resided on the internet or have been disseminated by any media. The Bill may be more damaging to the visual arts and music because this kind of work is more frequently disseminated on the web without due credit or, in some instances, with the artists name removed. This will also have an enormous impact on indigenous people's culture since their work is never attributed to any individual.

Consider an example: How would a person from Arkansas or Nigeria know about this law, that it even exists, that it affects him, that he has to register in an American registry for a fee, to protect his wedding picture or pictures of his children from being used by an American corporation or a non-for-profit-organization that may reflect values that are against his religion or his ethics which could add insult to injury? This is the just one instance of the damage the passage of this bill into law could do.

At the same time this Bill will promote the creation of privately held commercial registries. Private corporations will be able to create registries where all authors will have to register all of their work to protect them from becoming orphaned: ie; for a photographer, every click of the camera, for an illustrator, every sketch. Any work not registered could become orphaned and could be used and/or commercialized by any American entity. It will be the private sector that will decide the cost and the means of registering one's work.

Even if this Bill becomes a law in the United-States it will have a very big impact on creators around the world, on creators like you and me. This Bill, when passed into law, will not make any difference between the works created by an American citizen and the works created by anyone else in the world. The implication is that EVERY work from everyone in the world would have to be registered in the USA. (Not a bad way to create an economic boom for American corporations). This will create two different worlds with unfair competition: Only Americans will be able to appropriate most of the world works, while this practice will stay illegal in the rest of the world. Meanwhile, it may well induce a crash in the price of licensing work everywhere else.

This proposed law violates the international Berne Treaty and the TRIP negotiations (Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property TRIPs UNESCO.) It may be susceptible to an international lawsuit under international treaties.

Many American creators associations are against this Bill. They are asking their members to write letters to Congressman and Senators. They are also asking the same from the international community.

When this law is enacted in the US, the same lobbies will ask other governments to do likewise. If we do not voice our concern now it may be difficult to voice it later with credibility when the same law may be presented in ones own country.

We are asking you to take a minute and write a letter and fax it to Washington. Do not think it won't make a difference. It will.

A letter that you could use is available via the link below. Here is the link to the Illustrators Partnership in the US. We agree with their arguments. www.illustratorspartnership.org/01_topics/article.php?searchterm=00267

This Bill could be voted on in a few weeks. We urge you to act in the next few days.


Andre Cornellier
Copyright Chair
CAPIC

Ewan Nicholson
President
CAPIC

CAPIC To Honour Illustrator & Photographer

April 10, 2008

TORONTO, April 10, 2008 - The Canadian Association of Photographers and Illustrators in Communications (CAPIC) will present its Lifetime Achievement Award to illustrator Erik Dzenis and photographer Pat Lacroix at a special ceremony to be held in Toronto on Saturday, May 3, 2008.

Since 1986, CAPIC has honoured professional illustrators and photographers who have distinguished themselves with significant contributions to the communications arts in Canada and internationally throughout their careers.

ERIC DZENIS


Erik Dzenis
Rudolf Nuryev by Erik Dzenis

Images: (L) Self Portrait, (R) Rudolf Nureyev, both © Erik Dzenis


When Erik Dzenis draws a fine line, he makes it look easy. His ability to capture a likeness in the first few seconds of drawing is where the composition takes shape; and from there, the sky is the limit. His artistic discipline is the human form -- in any setting. He is a master artist in various mediums and is well known for his classic oil portraits.

Born in Latvia in 1925, Erik began drawing when he was a child. He joined the Academy of Arts in Riga, where his artistic vision developed. During the Second World War, his talents were put to work in the underground resistance movement, where he provided graphics, documents, sketches, and paintings, which helped him get through tough times and close calls. He met his wife-to-be in Donauworth, Germany, and they immigrated as political refugees to Canada, where Erik has since earned a successful living with his talents.

In 1950, he was hired by TDF Artists Ltd., and over the next 27 years Erik's commercial illustrations appeared in many nationwide ad campaigns, including Laura Secord, General Motors, Ford, Chrysler, and many others. His commercial work played a role in the shaping of North American culture.

Recognition of his artwork opened doors, and by the 1960s, Erik was drawing and painting the dancers of major ballet companies. The art of dance became his study for the next 30 years. It was a fantastic time for Erik. The world's leading dancers became his friends and artistic subjects.

Erik was also in demand for commissions of fine art oil and pastel portraits for many prominent Canadian business and government officials. Erik's boss and longtime friend from TDF Budd Feheley, made introductions and arranged for Erik to paint the portrait of Mr. Prentice Bloedel of MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., the first of many corporate commissions. The Princess Margaret Hospital commissioned Erik to paint portraits of key people in its organization.

Mr. Dzenis resides in Thornhill, Ontario, where he is still busy at work in his studio.

Pat Lacroix


Pat Lacroix

Red Ball


Images: (L) Self Portrait, (R) Red Ball, both © Pat Lacroix


Pat Lacroix was born and grew up in Victoria, B.C. After completing high school, he studied music at Westlake College in Los Angeles. In 1961 Pat and two friends founded a folk group called the Halifax Three. The two friends were Denny Doherty (later of the Mamas and the Papas) and Zal Yanovsky (the Lovin' Spoonful).

In the mid-60s Mr. Lacroix chose to leave music and concentrate on making a career out of his hobby, photography. With his show business experience as a foundation, Pat started his photography career making publicity photographs. Drag queens, strippers, rock and rollers, and in one case, a female impersonator with an eight foot boa constrictor, all became fodder for his eager camera.

His career zoomed when he turned his talents to advertising photography in the early 1970s. In the 1990s, he specialized in food, packaging, and editorial photography, retiring in 2005.

Pat Lacroix has won over 60 national and international awards, including Gold and Silver Awards from Marketing Magazine, the New York and Toronto Art Directors Clubs, as well as Clios, Photographis, Creativity Magazine Awards, CAPIC National Show awards, International Design Award and Communication Arts magazine annual. In addition, he was awarded first prize from the Club of Printing House Craftsmen for poster design and Studio Magazine’s portfolio award.

Mr. Lacroix, an original member of CAPIC, has lectured across North America.

He lives in Toronto with his wife, Patti.

CAPIC (The Canadian Association of Photographers and Illustrators in Communications), founded in 1978, is a not-for-profit arts association consisting of approximately 500 members across Canada. Members include the top professionals in photography, illustration and digital imaging. They provide outstanding imagery which is used in all forms of printed and digital communications.

CAPIC sets the standards for professional business practices within the visual communications industry; hosts meetings and seminars to help members keep up with industry changes, and acts as an advisory body to the advertising and communications industries with respect to copyright issues and other areas of legislative interest. www.capic.org

EVENT INFORMATION
CAPIC Lifetime Achievement Awards
Saturday, May 3, 2008
The Arts & Letters Club of Toronto
Reception 6 PM to 7 PM
Dinner 7 PM to 8:30 PM
Presentations 8:30 PM to 9:30 PM

TICKET INFORMATION

Ticket price $75.00 (price includes GST)
To order tickets call 416-462-3700
or email your request to: administrator@capic.org


Sponsored by

Vistekwww.vistek.ca

CAPIC Elects New President

May 20, 2007

1180713226


© 2007 Michael Kohn Studio

TORONTO - May 20, 2007 - The Board of Directors of CAPIC (the Canadian Association of Photographers & Illustrators in Communications) is pleased to announce the election of Michael Kohn, photographer, as President of the association.

Mr. Kohn, a native of Toronto, has previously served on the Board of Directors as Treasurer (2005-2007), VP Membership (2003- 2005) and Secretary (1985-1988).

A graduate of York University, Toronto (Applied Mathematics/Physics 1977) and Sheridan College, Oakville, Ontario (Applied Photography 1979) Mr. Kohn lives with his wife, cake designer Bonnie Gordon and two teenage children, in Toronto.

He started his business in 1982 and today specializes in food and beverage imagery for a range of North American clients. He has also been actively involved in the pursuit of copyright reform in Canada as it relates to commissioned photographic works. His work can be seen at www.michaelkohn.com

Mr. Kohn is represented in the US by Thomas Zumpano, Arte Conzorio Inc. www.arte-consorzio.us/

CAPIC Media Contact:

John Harquail
416-462-3677
1-888-252-2742
info@capic.org
www.capic.org

CAPIC HONOURS CANADIAN ILLUSTRATORS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS

June 01, 2006

TORONTO – May 12, 2006 - The Canadian Association of Photographers and Illustrators in Communications (CAPIC) will present its Lifetime Achievement Award to illustrator Roger Hill and photographer Douglas Kirkland at a special ceremony to be held in Toronto at The Arts & Letters Club, on Saturday, May 13, 2006.

Since 1986, CAPIC has honoured professional illustrators and photographers who have distinguished themselves with significant contributions to the communications arts in Canada and internationally throughout their careers.


ROGER HILL
http://homepage.mac.com/rogerhill2/PhotoAlbum9.html


Roger Hill was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario. He attended the Ontario College of Art (now Ontario College of Art & Design) graduating in 1965 with the Eaton Foundation Travelling Scholarship. After graduation he spent six months travelling and studying in Japan and Hong Kong then worked as an art director/designer for TDF Artists in Toronto for five years.

Mr. Hill has been a self-employed freelance illustrator/designer since 1970. His client list includes all major Canadian and US advertising agencys, editorial magazines and design firms. Specific accounts include Coca-Cola, Levis Strauss, ChristieBrown, Kodak, Mcdonalds, The Toronto Symphony, Canada Post, The Calgary Stampede, Campbell’s Soup, Minute Maid, Labatt’s, Molson Breweries, The Royal Canadian Mint, The Ontario Science Center, Ontario Place, Laura Secord, Kimberly-Clark, Kraft Foods, Ghiaradelli Chocolates, Heineken Beer and others.

Mr. Hill has won numerous awards throughout his career. A sampling of some of those awards:

1992: Royal Ontario Museum Campaign.
Gold Campaign award at the Billies.
Gold Silver and Bronze awards at the Marketing Awards.
Obies from the Outdoor Advertising Association of America.

1993: Best Outdoor Billboard in Canada, Cannes Festival.
Gold and Silver Awards at The Toronto Art Directors Club Award Show.
Billie Awards Hall of Fame for Campbell’s Sweater.
National Magazine Awards

In addition to winning four Clios (Clio Awards, a leading global awards competition recognizing excellence in advertising and design) Mr. Hill was a recipient of The Les Usherwood Award for Lifetime Achievement in Advertising (Advertising & Design Club of Toronto) in 1995.

Profiles of his work have been published in Studio Magazine, Applied Arts Magazine, theToronto Star and Communication Arts Magazine Awards Annuals. Mr. Hill was commissioned by the Royal Canadian Mint to design and produce the1995 silver dollar commemorating the Macintosh apple. He has also designed and produced 16 commemorative Canada Post stamps including the award winning Science and Technology series. His work also includes the illustrations used for the entire line of Laura Secord packaging, the graphic illustrations on the Lantic Sugar packaging and Tetley Tea products.

Mr. Hill has taught illustration at the Ontario College of Art and Design and recently had a one man show at Passages Art Gallery (Toronto) October 2004. Mr. Hill is a founding member of CAPIC.



DOUGLAS KIRKLAND
www.douglaskirkland.com


Douglas Kirkland was born in Toronto, and raised in Fort Erie, Ontario.

He joined Look Magazine in his early twenties, and later Life Magazine during the golden age of photojournalism. Among his assignments were essays on Greece, Lebanon and Japan as well as fashion and celebrity work, photographing Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor and Marlene Dietrich among others.

Through the years, Douglas Kirkland has worked on the sets of over one hundred motion pictures. Among them, “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”, “2001 A Space Odyssey”, “Out of Africa”, “Titanic” and “Moulin Rouge”.

His books include “Light Years”, “Icons”, “Legends”, “Body Stories”, “An Evening With Marilyn” and the best selling “James Cameron’s Titanic”.

He was one of the producers and photographers of “A Day In the Life of Canada”, one of a series of “Day In The Life Of” photographic coffee table books featuring various countries.

Douglas Kirkland’s fine art photography has been exhibited around the world and he is a sought after lecturer. He is a member of the prestigious Hewlett Packard “Photo Influencers” and Canon’s “Explorers of Light” and is an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASOC). He has received a “Lifetime Achievement Award” from the Society Of Camareamen (S.O.C.), Photographer of the Year from the Photo Marketing Association and a Lucie Award for Outstanding Achievement in Entertainment Photography from the International Photography Awards (IPA). Among his current projects are a book on Milan based artist Kris Ruhs and a black & white volume “When We Were Young”. “An Evening With Marilyn” was recently published in the United States by Welcome Books. Mr. Kirkland has just returned from Moscow where he was awarded "The Golden Eye of Russia Award" by the Guild of Russian Photographers.

For the past 35 years, Mr. Kirkland has generously donated his time to the development of Canadian photographers through presentations and mentoring.

When not travelling, his home and studio is in the Hollywood Hills where he lives with his wife and business partner Françoise.

CAPIC (The Canadian Association of Photographers and Illustrators in Communications), founded in 1978, is a non-profit organization consisting of approximately 600 members across Canada. Members include the top professionals in photography, illustration and digital imaging. They provide outstanding imagery which is used in all forms of printed communications.

CAPIC sets the standards for professional business practices within the visual communications industry; hosts meetings and seminars to help members keep up with industry changes, and acts as an advisory body to the advertising and communications industries with respect to copyright issues and other areas of legislative interest. www.capic.org

Media Contact:

Kelly Sheard
CriticalCommunications
O (416) 703-2823
C (647) 227-2310
kelly@criticalcommunications.ca
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